CDC confirms second case of Zika virus infection in Missouri – Columbia Daily Tribune

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Wednesday confirmed the second case of a Missourian contracting the Zika virus, according to a news release from the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services.


The state health department would not reveal where in Missouri the woman lives but said she had traveled to Honduras, a known area of Zika transmission. She is the state’s first confirmed case of pregnant woman infected with the virus.



The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Wednesday confirmed the second case of a Missourian contracting the Zika virus, according to a news release from the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services.


The state health department would not reveal where in Missouri the woman lives but said she had traveled to Honduras, a known area of Zika transmission. She is the state’s first confirmed case of pregnant woman infected with the virus.

There had been one reported case of Zika virus infection in Missouri, but it also was related to foreign travel. The virus rapidly spread through Central and South America this past year, with more than 20 countries now facing epidemics.

Symptoms can include low-grade fever, joint soreness, headaches, rashes and red eyes, but most people infected with the virus develop no symptoms. There is no treatment or cure for the Zika virus, but symptoms dissipate as the virus runs its course.

The primary public health concern with Zika virus is a possible correlation to microcephaly, a birth defect characterized by an abnormally small head and brain damage. The CDC says the virus can spread through mosquito bites, unprotected sexual contact, blood transfusion or from an infected pregnant woman to her fetus.

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